Take a Peek Into the Industrial Revolution

With the Miami Beach Convention Center  recently completing a $615-million state-of-the-art transformation, you can bet more business travelers will likely be heading down to South Beach (SoBe)for meetings and conferences. 

If you are one of the lucky ducks who has a conference in SoBe and you find yourself with a spare hour or so, think about heading over to the Wolfsonian- Florida International University Museum. It’s right in the heart of the city, just blocks from the Convention Center at Washington and 10th and its permanent and rotating exhibits dating from the Industrial Revolution through the end of the Second World War are fantastic.
The building itself, the Washington Storage Company, was expanded and renovated in 1992 by architect Mark Hampton in collaboration with architect William Kearns to convert it from a storage place for Mitchell Wolfson, Jr.’s large collection of rare books and objects on modern design, architecture and decorative arts into a museum and research center. The modernist lobby, museum café and shop are just a prelude to the exhibit space for permanent and temporary galleries dramatically arranged around light wells, 

The museum is open various hours every day except Wed. and it’s just $10 to get in (or free on Friday nights from 6-9 if you happen to be there then) So if you’re in Miami Beach for work and find that elusive bit of time that we business travelers sometimes get, head down to Washington and 10th and poke into the Wolfsonian-FIU and get lost in a whimsical “blast from the past” 
Wolfsonian- FIU
1001 Washington Avenue
(corner of Washington and 10th)
Miami Beach, FL 33139

Miami Beach: A Quiet Walk in a Busy City

Amid the chaos of club music pouring out of every door and the sun-baked tourists walking up and down the beach and in and out of the shops and restaurants on Lincoln Road is the Holocaust Memorial. Located not far off that bustling road, directly behind the convention center at 1933-1945 Meridian Avenue, this quiet oasis with sculptures, photographs and a reflecting pool, offers a destination that you can walk through and pause at to reflect on this poignant moment in history. According to the website, the four-story bronze arm tattooed with a number from Auschwitz rising from the earth and stretching toward the heavens, represents those who died in concentration camps thinking that no one would care or remember.  If you’re in town on business and find yourself with a few minutes between meetings or dinner, make your way to this quiet and beautiful memorial. It’s open 9 a.m. to sundown daily and there is no charge for admission.